#1  
Old 03-22-2017, 09:43 PM
ne14t ne14t is offline
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Question Hint logic issue

So I have run into the following situation twice tonight...

I will have a clue that states: Of (A) and (B), one is (C) and the other is (D).

I had to use a hint because I could not logically trace any more deductions.

The hint then states: Since (A != 7) ... which is accurate... and (A) and (B) must be (C) and (D), it follows that (C != 7). ... mark (C = 7) as FALSE.

It seems like they are making an assumption here that it is (A = C) & (B = D). If it ended up being that (B = C) & (A = D), then it would be fine for (C = 7).

I should have taken a screenshot, but I did not know I was going to be posting in the forum.

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 03-23-2017, 06:00 AM
zenobia43 zenobia43 is offline
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Suppose you had this clue:

Of the essay written by Dr. Callahan and the one that was 10 pages long, one was about volcanos, and the other was in Chapter 4.

And suppose from your grid you could see that Dr. Callahan wasn't the author of the 7-page essay.

You could conclude that neither the essay on volcanos nor the essay in Chapter 4 could be 7 pages long.

That example was easy. But how about this clue:

Of the essay written by Dr. Callahan and the one that was in Chapter 4, one was about volcanos, and the other was about oceanography.

How do we know that neither of the options in the right side of this clue can be the 7-page essay?

Suppose from your grid you could see that Dr. Callahan wasn't the author of the 7-page essay (like in the previous example), and you also had a positive relation between Chapter 4 and the 10-page essay.

We know that Dr. Callahan wasn't the author of the 7-page essay, and because of that positive relation between Chapter 4 and the 10-page essay, Chapter 4 cannot be the 7-page essay either.

Therefore, neither option mentioned in the right side of the clue can be the 7-page essay. Why? Because neither option in the left side can be the 7-page essay, and the right side can only match one of the two options in the left side.

Without seeing the screen shot and your grid state, the above explanations are pure guesswork. However, this is one possible explanation for the hint system's attempt to be helpful in your example.
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  #3  
Old 03-23-2017, 07:28 AM
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uigrad uigrad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ne14t View Post
So I have run into the following situation twice tonight...

I will have a clue that states: Of (A) and (B), one is (C) and the other is (D).

The hint then states: Since (A != 7) ... which is accurate...
Which category was "7" in? I'm guessing it was in the same category as B.

Let's say that B is 8. Maybe the category is "number of goals scored." If that is the case, then B cannot be 7, simply because it is 8!!

So, if (A != 7) and (B !=7) and C is either A or B, then C cannot be 7.

If you do the moderate puzzles, you have to use this type of clue in almost every puzzle. You never need that type of clue for the easy puzzles though.

I took a screenshot of an example that is almost exactly like yours:



Of (A) and (B), one is (C) and one is (D).

A = Swaziland
B = April
C = 6,910
D = Lacquerware

A is not May (already established), and B is not May (innately, since it is a different option from the same category).

So C and D cannot be May.
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