#11  
Old 05-06-2016, 10:26 AM
jeffnn jeffnn is offline
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Originally Posted by SevenDeadlySquids View Post
Interestingly enough, I'm pretty sure it used to be possible to look at the background before beginning. This was about one or two years ago. I'm not sure why they changed it.
They threw out all the old records as well. Understand some of the changes but all the unnecessary ones were for the worse.
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  #12  
Old 05-07-2016, 07:59 AM
pcuser pcuser is offline
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They threw out all the old records as well. Understand some of the changes but all the unnecessary ones were for the worse.
When they threw out those records, it decimated my trophy case...
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  #13  
Old 05-11-2016, 05:09 AM
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Harry Monster Harry Monster is offline
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I'd like to chime in supporting Zenobia43's brilliant suggestion:

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Originally Posted by zenobia43 View Post
... what if there was an intermediate page between starting the puzzle and seeing the entire grid and clues? If you abandoned the puzzle at that point, it would count as an unsolved puzzle. If you continued, then you would get to study the backstory without the timer running before seeing the rest of the puzzle.
In an effort to get the fastest times I can't take the time to read the backstory and goals. This makes me feel like I'm missing out.

I haven't come near the 30 second limit yet, but I suspect the people who regularly hit the 30 second mark have seen the same puzzle many times and are able to fill in answers without even reading the clues. Even though I've seen some puzzles more than once, I don't remember the answers I had before and still have to fill in the grids using the clues. At my best on the easiest puzzles, I've gotten under a minute. Of course that means I don't read the backstories any more.

Cheers to the original poster, Gouda. I hope the Puzzle Baron uses this suggestion!

- = M = -
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  #14  
Old 05-11-2016, 08:05 AM
jeffnn jeffnn is offline
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Default Familiarity

The 30 seconds usually only happens on the 3x4 puzzles and familiarity isn't required. Familiarity with general patterns can help with the larger puzzles though, in this case having seen the pattern, and not necessarily the specific puzzle, frequently is what helps. In order to be helped by having seen the exact same puzzle before, generally one would need an eidetic memory.

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Originally Posted by Harry Monster View Post
I'd like to chime in supporting Zenobia43's brilliant suggestion:



In an effort to get the fastest times I can't take the time to read the backstory and goals. This makes me feel like I'm missing out.

I haven't come near the 30 second limit yet, but I suspect the people who regularly hit the 30 second mark have seen the same puzzle many times and are able to fill in answers without even reading the clues. Even though I've seen some puzzles more than once, I don't remember the answers I had before and still have to fill in the grids using the clues. At my best on the easiest puzzles, I've gotten under a minute. Of course that means I don't read the backstories any more.

Cheers to the original poster, Gouda. I hope the Puzzle Baron uses this suggestion!

- = M = -
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  #15  
Old 05-11-2016, 04:48 PM
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Harry Monster Harry Monster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnn View Post
The 30 seconds usually only happens on the 3x4 puzzles and familiarity isn't required. Familiarity with general patterns can help with the larger puzzles though, in this case having seen the pattern, and not necessarily the specific puzzle, frequently is what helps. In order to be helped by having seen the exact same puzzle before, generally one would need an eidetic memory.
I'll respectfully disagree with you on the eidetic memory requirement. Often I see people post 3 or 4 comments on the same puzzle, meaning they've done it at least that many times. If they simply remembered the flavor of the football cake or which reactor was a fusor type, they would be able to fill the grid in more quickly.

While familiarity with the puzzle may not be required for some people to get those 30 second times, I still believe that many people get those short solving times after having seen the puzzle more than once.

Anyway, apologies for causing topic drift in this thread. Really, I only wanted to support the idea of having a "pre-page" with the backstory on it so that we can enjoy it outside the time we're competing to solve the puzzle. I think that's a fine idea.

- = M = -
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  #16  
Old 05-12-2016, 08:49 AM
cerine cerine is offline
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I think jeffnn is right about needing an eidetic memory. I have a pretty good memory, and even after seeing an individual puzzle a dozen times, I can't ever remember any part of the solution. Not with any confidence, anyway; there are just too many puzzles with the same back story to keep them straight.

And I find that having seen the same back story before (so I already know what the relevant interval is, if there are any gotchas I need to watch for like 7 am vs 7 pm, etc.) usually helps just as much as having seen the individual puzzle before. The only exception is on the rare occasions when I get stuck on a puzzle; when I see that puzzle again, I can usually remember the trick I needed to get past the block, even if I can't remember the result I got.
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  #17  
Old 05-13-2016, 02:59 AM
brianhh brianhh is offline
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agreed - it's not memory about a specific puzzle. there are too many puzzles w/ the same elements that have different clues and different answers to be able to consciously recognize any, IMHO. i know i don't. yes, when i do a puzzle that i've done many times, i'll 'know' the categories, and that helps w/ separating them - this puzzle has 2 sets of countries, gotta look at both to see which is in which, this grid has these types of names, etc etc. i agree that it (familiarity) helps solve the puzzles faster but i would really be surprised if anyone was able to read the backstory and recall the exact solution.

admin could fix that - shuffle the order of the rows and columns for one or 2 of the elements.. would make the answer checker a bit more complex, but still doable. :-)

.bri.
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  #18  
Old 05-13-2016, 08:35 AM
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uigrad uigrad is offline
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I've had some sub-30 times on the 3x4 puzzles, and sub-50 times on 4x5 puzzles. I don't know the lower limit for times on the larger puzzles, but it's 50s for the 4x5.

I frequently come across my own name in the comments, and in some cases, I've seen the same puzzle 4 or 5 times. I have a pretty good memory, but I don't know it's the same puzzle until after I've submitted the solution, and see the comments.

There are 2 exceptions to this. There is a 4x4 puzzle where the green dots make perfect diagonals all the way across the grid. I've hit it a few times, and notice it right before submitting. The other exception was a 4x4 puzzle that I did twice in the span of 3 days. I noticed that the clues were exactly in the same order, and because of that, I remembered which order to read the clues in. It may have saved me 5-10 seconds on that puzzle!

The case where I got the same puzzle twice in 3 days and remembered all the clues was more than a year ago. Since then, a huge number of puzzles have been added. I would agree with those above who say that there is virtually no chance of remembering an exact puzzle today. I still do find my comments in puzzles, and occasionally I'll find the same puzzle twice in 3 days, but if that happens now, you can assume I've probably lots of puzzles between them, making it impossible to remember the exact clues.

Back to the original discussion, I don't think that reading the backstory is necessary at all for getting good times. I would like it if someone compiled all the backstories and posted them somewhere just so I can read them all, because I obviously have no chance to read them while solving. Sometimes, if there's a lot of network lag, I have time to read the backstory while waiting for the submit button to work, but it's pretty sad that this is necessary. Why even bother writing the backstories if the players don't have time to read them?
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  #19  
Old 05-13-2016, 10:28 AM
pcuser pcuser is offline
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I haven't spent that much time on the new format puzzles, but the old format was such that I could recognize underlying patterns in puzzles to the point that I never had to read the clues except for the first particular kind of clue to immediately solve the puzzles. It helped that I had a degree in theoretical math and was skilled at seeing patterns in abstract sets and forms. Remember that there are only a finite number of patterns in the solutions of these puzzles. If you find that pattern, you can do likewise, though it can get boring...
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  #20  
Old 05-15-2016, 11:58 AM
theomeo1 theomeo1 is offline
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Do you believe doing logic puzzles can help in predicting, stock market?
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